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Salon.com: Fox’s Favorite Muslim radical

7 March 2011 General 4 Comments Email This Post Email This Post

By Justin Elliot

On Thursday, the radical Muslim and veteran provocateur Anjem Choudary plans to hold a demonstration in front of the White House calling for an extreme form of sharia to reign in America.

Whether the protest actually goes forward — there’s a real chance it won’t, if Choudary’s past stunts are any guide — doesn’t really matter. Choudary, who is known for applauding terrorism and calling for stonings of gay people and the overthrow of democratic governments, has already logged several appearances on Fox and CNN, generated a bunch of articles in the right-wing press, and even prompted a member of Congress to demand that he be banned from the country. All that in the last month.

Choudary is a London-based preacher who has over the past decade become the face of radical Islam in the British press — especially in the tabloids, and even more especially the right-wing papers owned by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. — despite having no religious credentials and virtually no public support. In fact, according to those who have tracked his career in Britain, Choudary is wholly a press creation.

“He’s a media whore,” says Mehdi Hasan, a senior editor at the New Statesman who has covered Choudary. “There are real Islamist groups that can get crowds together but his is not one of them. He doesn’t have the numbers to make good on his claims. What he does have is a media that’s very happy to play the game with him.”

Now, Choudary, 43, is using the same formula — making deliberately offensive statements and trumpeting plans for provocative demonstrations — in the United States, where the media has proved all too willing to accommodate him. He can be understood as the Muslim analogue of Terry Jones, the obscure Florida preacher who created an international controversy last year with plans for a “Burn the Quran Day.” He is a radical with minuscule public support, but one who can, given enough free airtime, do real-world damage.

Last month on Fox Sean Hannity had a sparring match with the preacher that ended with Hannity calling him “one sick, miserable, evil SOB.” (It’s worth noting that Fox has the same parent company, News Corp., as some of the U.K. tabloids that obsessively cover Choudary.) Here’s a taste of the exchange:

Two weeks later, Choudary was back on the network, where an angry Gretchen Carlson told him that “I can tell you one thing, Americans don’t want sharia law.” Adam Serwer has argued that Choudary is, for Fox, a “cartoonish buffoon who can be counted on to confirm every stereotype about Islam and Muslims.”

But it’s not just Fox. Late last year Eliot Spitzer had Choudary on CNN and heroically derided him as a “violent and heinous terrorist.” In February, Spitzer hosted him again to argue that the revolution in Egypt was an “Islamist uprising.” Choudary has also been on programs with ABC’s Christiane Amanpour and CNN’s Fareed Zakaria.

So where did Choudary come from? Born and raised in Britain, his rise to prominence came as the right-hand man of Omar Bakri, a founder of the extremist group Al Muhajiroun. Like Choudary today, Bakri was a press-hungry provocateur, but he also played a role “in the radicalization of some young men,” according to the BBC. Bakri left the U.K. for Lebanon after the 7/7 bombings in 2005. The British government has since barred him from re-entering the country, and Bakri has been charged in Lebanon with forming a militant group to undermine the government there.

In Bakri’s absence, Choudary became the leader of Al Muhajiroun’s successor group, Islam4UK. Both were proscribed in 2010 under a British law that allows for groups to be banned if they “unlawfully glorify the commission or preparation of acts of terrorism.”

(Choudary has not always been so devout. The Daily Mail published an exposélast year revealing that, while he was student at Southampton University, he had been a hard-partier who gambled, drank, used drugs, looked at porn and had sex with Christian women. The paper had pictures to prove most of the charges.)

When I spoke to Choudary Tuesday, he refused to discuss how many followers he had, beyond claiming that he can attract 150 people to his lectures. “I’m not going to give you details of our administration,” he said. But according to Inayat Bunglawala, a Muslim commentator who is involved in combatting extremism in Britain, Choudary’s record for getting large numbers of people to turn out to events is thin. Bunglawala points to a 2009 demonstration at a parade in the town of Luton in which Choudary and his cohort held signs assailing British troops returning from Iraq as “butchers” and “terrorists.”

Choudary and some of his followers had advertised the event by leafletting for a week among the 20,000-strong Muslim population in the town, says Bunglawala, who has closely tracked Choudary’s career. But the turnout was vanishingly small. “Literally only 20 people showed up and yet they got the front pages of just about every right-wing tabloid the next day. Even the BBC gave them a lot of coverage on that.” Bunglawala observes: “It’s almost a symbiotic relationship between Choudary and the right-wing papers.”

Justin Elliott is a Salon reporter. Reach him by email at jelliott@salon.com and follow him on Twitter @ElliottJustin More: Justin Elliott

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4 Comments »

  1. Let’s see what kind of turn-out he gets for this “protest” at the White House…..

    In the meantime, these media outlets won’t interview imams whose stance is consistent with American values.

    Is that intentional on their part? It’s obvious that is is….

  2. note how this guy, apparently the islamic equivalent of a Tea-Bagger, still manages to maintain a more civil discourse. oh and his point is well taken that life under Sharia law would be no worse than life under Fundy/Teabugger rule, except that along with prohibiting any free expression of sexuality, repressing women and stifling any counter discourse( all of which WOULD OCCUR under fundy Xtian rule), the Muslims would at least PROVIDE FOOD SHELTER AND MEDICAL- which the teabaggers would happily deprine us of in the name of “patriotism” read capitalism

  3. i love tea bagging chics

  4. Absoulutely typical for the Muslim so-called ‘ummah’ to blame somebody else for the dregs of their society. Muslims, don’t kid yourselves into thinking this isn’t your fault.

    Your reactions are predictable. Suicide bombings? Blame ‘western imperialism’ and the ‘right to resist under occupation.’ (Which I guess includes wanton genocide – I’d rather be occupied by Zionists thanks – by the way, anything on the deaths of muslims by muslims or non-muslims by muslims? Oh, that’s right, you don’t care who Muslims kill do you?)

    Radicals having whiny little temper-tantrums on the streets? ‘Don’t listen to them, they’re the fault of the western media giving them airtime.’ Unlike their BNP counterparts, nothing done to combat them other than; ‘you don’t represent us, islam is a religion of peace, shut up, shut up, stop criticising my religion.’ Unlike their BNP counterparts, their freedom of speech is protected.

    Western way of life? Complain some more and claim Islam is superior while hypocritically calling us ‘arrogant’. Declare you are the sources of civilisation and then call yourselves the ‘new jews’ with the brass neck of a statue of a giraffe.

    Unlike you I don’t want anyone to get hurt. I am a peace loving atheist. I just want the Muslim world to change or abandon their religion and grow up.

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