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Nigerians Want to Transcend Sectarian and Ethnic Violence

12 January 2012 Loonwatch.com 12 Comments Email This Post Email This Post

Nigerians Want to Transcend Sectarian and Ethnic Violence

There are those who look at violence between Muslims and Christians with glee, such as Robert Spencer and Pamela Geller. For them it is more fodder to smear Islam for the actions of some Muslims, while dismissing the same logic for Christian attacks on Muslims.

What boggles their mind however is when Muslims and Christians come together and oppose sectarianism and actively seek peace and reconciliation.

This is the case in Nigeria, where many want to transcend sectarian and ethnic violence (h/t: SK).

Here for example are pictures of recent protests in Nigeria showing solidarity and unity between Nigerians and Muslims:

Muslim and Christian Nigerians holding up their respective symbols

Muslim and Christian Nigerians holding up their respective symbols


An Imam and a Pastor in a show of unity

Christians protesters protecting praying Muslim protesters (something we also saw in Egypt):

These are the forces and the voices who should be promoted. Yet extremists on both sides want to see violence in a push for power.

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12 Comments »

  1. I’ll never understand why humans prefer violence over peace..

  2. Violence is a result of fear, hatred and bigotry. More have died in the name of religion than any other man-made cause. Remove religion and there is little reason to hate.

  3. Very sad when the people lose their voice . . .

  4. africans unite!

  5. Religion doesn’t cause violence. Religion is used by those who seek power and wish to subjugate and control others. Just like nationalism. As long as there are human beings there, will be violence.

    That said, I’m glad to see that some Muslims are raising their voices in the rejection of sectarian, ethnic and religious prejudice and persecution. That’s what will change the perceptions of others.

  6. The most Islamic thing we can do is help with awareness and solidarity as the nigerian and congolese people fight their dictators and imperialist assaults on their people and economy.

  7. More have died in the name of religion? Is there empirical evidence for this? If you remove religion people will just find other reasons to hate. The problem is not religion for the most part, it is human beings.

  8. Awww love this :D

  9. As the Moslems contiue to murder the Copts, and the Nigerian Christians.. on one hand they say “peace” on the other… they carry a sword to chop of the heads of unbelievers.

  10. It is not that there are groups of murderous brigands running amok.

    It is that the authorities involved – army, police, – seem powerless to control them.

    That is because the general opinion is that the Christians should die or be driven out.

  11. I have seen and heard all this before in the US south during the segregation struggle.

    My family are all good kind people who would never harm anyone. Gee, it’s terrible that the KKK boys are out there doing this horrible stuff. However, who do them nigras think they are?

  12. You guys have no idea, the reason for this sudden unity in Nigeria is because of the economic protests against the govt, there is a conspiracy theory about the government detonating bombs and accusing Boko Haram to divide and rule the populace, the Nigerian Muslim started these theories to exonerate Islam of the bombings.

    Nigeria has a common enemy, the govt, but the true face of Nigerian moderate Muslims was shown last April when Christians were widely killed just because a Christian was declared the winner of the presidential election, just google the history of Muslims’ violence on Christians in Nigeria, you will see that Boko Haram didn’t kill as much Christians as the moderate Muslims did, don’t be fooled by the ‘spur of the moment’ type unity, I’m a Nigerian.

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